Social Construct

Observations from the evolving world of social media and digital marketing. Not to be taken too seriously.

The idea is simple: your brain is constantly monitoring what’s happening in your body. It analyzes things like muscle tension, posture, heart rate, breathing, and, yes, facial expressions, to judge how you are feeling.

Put yourself in a happier position, and you can boost your mood.

—Ah, the art of faking it until you make it.  (via fastcompany)

smithsonianlibraries:

13 Species of Thecla (genus) butterflies from Insecta. Lepidoptera-Rhopalocera of Biologia Centrali-Americana, an encyclopedia of natural history of Central America. A landmark and still often-cited work, Smithsonian Libraries has digitized 58 volumes that you can explore at electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana.

smithsonianlibraries:

13 Species of Thecla (genus) butterflies from Insecta. Lepidoptera-Rhopalocera of Biologia Centrali-Americana, an encyclopedia of natural history of Central America. A landmark and still often-cited work, Smithsonian Libraries has digitized 58 volumes that you can explore at electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana.

fastcompany:

“Starbucks is not a startup. To behave as a startup is completely irresponsible. Innovation is good, but unwarranted testing at the customer’s expense, even at a rather small scale, is unacceptable.”
The world’s largest coffeehouse chain regularly launches products before they’re perfect. Does such a risky approach to innovation work?
A look inside Starbucks’s innovation process, which, as it turns out, is one big leap of faith.

fastcompany:

“Starbucks is not a startup. To behave as a startup is completely irresponsible. Innovation is good, but unwarranted testing at the customer’s expense, even at a rather small scale, is unacceptable.”

The world’s largest coffeehouse chain regularly launches products before they’re perfect. Does such a risky approach to innovation work?

A look inside Starbucks’s innovation process, which, as it turns out, is one big leap of faith.

helloyoucreatives:

Rebranding Abercrombie & Fitch. The number one brand for the homeless. 

fastcompany:


We can all agree that the conference room is probably not where your best ideas are born. Which is why taking a run is far from a waste of time.

The Takeaway: Often, the most productive meetings take place outside the office.

fastcompany:

The Takeaway: Often, the most productive meetings take place outside the office.

fastcompany:

Want To Advance Your Career? Then Work On Your EQ
In case you don’t yet feel it, emotional intelligence—the ability regulate emotions in one’s self and identify emotions in others—is a predictor of workplace success, both for employees and managers.
Taken together, emotional intelligence—and its associated intuitions—may be helpful for leaders, teams, and companies looking to grow (and create). Drawing from Daniel Goleman’s landmark Emotional Intelligence, Ebokosia describes its five factors of Emotional Intellgience as such:
Empathy: The ability to shift perspectives and gain a better understanding of others, or, in fancy-pants language, “inter-subjectivize.”
Motivation: The driving force(s) of your actions. Your compass, north star, wayfinding. Your interior cartographic prowess.
Self-regulation: Being able to deal with your own emotions before they deal with you. Linked with delaying gratification and not eating the marshmallow.
Social skills: Knowing what to say in order to engage your team—and knowing how not to offend them.
Self-awareness: Understanding your own emotions improves your interactions, since getting intimate with your feelings lets you better understand how they affect others.
Here’s the full story.
[Image: Flickr user Wendell]

fastcompany:

Want To Advance Your Career? Then Work On Your EQ

In case you don’t yet feel it, emotional intelligence—the ability regulate emotions in one’s self and identify emotions in others—is a predictor of workplace success, both for employees and managers.

Taken together, emotional intelligence—and its associated intuitions—may be helpful for leaders, teams, and companies looking to grow (and create). Drawing from Daniel Goleman’s landmark Emotional Intelligence, Ebokosia describes its five factors of Emotional Intellgience as such:

  • Empathy: The ability to shift perspectives and gain a better understanding of others, or, in fancy-pants language, “inter-subjectivize.”
  • Motivation: The driving force(s) of your actions. Your compass, north star, wayfinding. Your interior cartographic prowess.
  • Self-regulation: Being able to deal with your own emotions before they deal with you. Linked with delaying gratification and not eating the marshmallow.
  • Social skills: Knowing what to say in order to engage your team—and knowing how not to offend them.
  • Self-awareness: Understanding your own emotions improves your interactions, since getting intimate with your feelings lets you better understand how they affect others.

Here’s the full story.

[Image: Flickr user Wendell]

fastcompany:

For Happier Employees, Learn To Give More Gratitude Than “Thx”
We all know happier companies make more money—and nothing makes for happier employees than learning how to show real gratitude for what they do. Here are some pointers to get you started today.
How to really say thank you
Goulston lays out three steps for getting good at giving gratitude: 
Be precise: Thank the person specifically for their exceptional actions: Tell them what they’re doing awesome.
Acknowledge the effort: Note the personal cost of their getting it done. If they work through the weekend, appreciate the social and family costs.
Share your stakeholdership: Make a point of how their great work helps your work, show how you’re in this together.
Developing a sense of how to show gratitude is a leadership key—one that can help you (and your employees) reach their potential.
Here’s the full story. Want more? 
How To Give A Meaningful “Thank You”

fastcompany:

For Happier Employees, Learn To Give More Gratitude Than “Thx”

We all know happier companies make more money—and nothing makes for happier employees than learning how to show real gratitude for what they do. Here are some pointers to get you started today.

How to really say thank you

Goulston lays out three steps for getting good at giving gratitude: 

  1. Be precise: Thank the person specifically for their exceptional actions: Tell them what they’re doing awesome.
  2. Acknowledge the effort: Note the personal cost of their getting it done. If they work through the weekend, appreciate the social and family costs.
  3. Share your stakeholdership: Make a point of how their great work helps your work, show how you’re in this together.

Developing a sense of how to show gratitude is a leadership key—one that can help you (and your employees) reach their potential.

Here’s the full story. Want more? 

How To Give A Meaningful “Thank You”